Slow Runner

I’m weaving a commission, of sorts.

I very rarely get requests for woven items. I’ve turned too many hobbies into work, so I have no interest in selling my pieces unless it’s a way to find them homes. But the piece I’m working on at the moment isn’t technically a ‘commission’ as I’m not planning to charge for it.

It’s a table runner for a friend who has a very long dining table. Four metres long, I think. The runner is going to be three metres. Otherwise the only specification was that it would be mainly blue.

Inspiration came from the location of the house, which has a panoramic view of islands and water.

I’ve taken the horizon line and used it to divide the runner lengthwise into two blues. I didn’t want to be too literal, so the only other features are grey rectangles that cross the horizon line.

Originally the rectangles were orange which, being the complimentary of blue, made the blue really pop. But the recipient didn’t like the orange so I change it to grey. They represent squalls of rain blowing through.

Runners are often warp rep, which is not my favourite weave structure. To get the wavy dividing line of the horizon I’m using clasped weft, and to get solid blues and a good thick runner I’m using weft rep. When I first came up with this combination I googled and looked in Interweave back issues, but found almost nothing like what I wanted to do. I did some sampling and worked out that to get a thick fabric I needed a very thick warp. I wound up buying 12/24 cotton. While I was at the workshop, I described what I wanted to do to Kay and she saw no reason it wouldn’t work.

So after months of deliberation, I got started.

Warping up was fast – only 60 threads to wind and tie on. To my relief, the weaving worked just as I planned. Only it took maybe an hour to weave around 10cm. That means I have just 29 hours of weaving left to do to finish the runner.

Hmm. This may take some time.